Are you eligible for SNAP? See if you might qualify by using our SNAP & WIC eligibility calculator

New York SNAP Eligibility Information - Oct. 1, 2022 through Sept. 30, 2023

There are three eligibility tests for SNAP: the Gross Income, the Net Income, and the Asset tests. Depending on your state and whether your household has an elderly (over 60) or disabled member, your household may be exempt from the Gross Income, Net Income, and/or Asset tests.

While the Gross Income and Asset tests are straightforward, Net Income is more difficult to calculate. We recommend using our SNAP Eligibility Calculator to see you're income eligible for SNAP benefits.

This information was collected from USDA and state SNAP resources but is not official. This website is not affiliated with any government organization or SNAP/WIC program. Privacy policy.

Gross Income Limits
Total monthly household income before taxes, including job, self-employment, and other income like social security, disability, child support, worker's comp, unemployment, and pension income.
If Any Household Members are Elderly or Disabled
  • If the household has an elderly or disabled member but is over the gross income limit below, the household can instead qualify by meeting the Net Income and Asset tests.
  • 1 person
    $2266 / month
  • 2 people
    $3052 / month
  • 3 people
    $3840 / month
  • 4 people
    $4626 / month
  • 5 people
    $5412 / month
  • 6 people
    $6200 / month
  • 7 people
    $6986 / month
  • Each additional person
    +$788 / month
The gross income limit for households with any elderly or disabled member that don't meet the asset test is 200% of the federal poverty level.
If Dependent Child in Household
  • 1 person
    $2266 / month
  • 2 people
    $3052 / month
  • 3 people
    $3840 / month
  • 4 people
    $4626 / month
  • 5 people
    $5412 / month
  • 6 people
    $6200 / month
  • 7 people
    $6986 / month
  • Each additional person
    +$788 / month
The gross income limit is 200% of the federal poverty level.
If Earned Income (Job or Self-Employment)
  • 1 person
    $1699 / month
  • 2 people
    $2289 / month
  • 3 people
    $2880 / month
  • 4 people
    $3469 / month
  • 5 people
    $4059 / month
  • 6 people
    $4650 / month
  • 7 people
    $5239 / month
  • Each additional person
    +$591 / month
The gross income limit is 150% of the federal poverty level.
All Other Households
  • 1 person
    $1472 / month
  • 2 people
    $1983 / month
  • 3 people
    $2496 / month
  • 4 people
    $3006 / month
  • 5 people
    $3517 / month
  • 6 people
    $4030 / month
  • 7 people
    $4540 / month
  • Each additional person
    +$512 / month
The gross income limit is 130% of the federal poverty level.
Net Income Limits
Gross income minus deductions. At the bottom of the page are some of the expenses that can be deducted to calculate net income. It's difficult to calculate net income without a SNAP calculator as there are additional deductions based on earned income and limits on amount of shelter-related deductions.

SNAP benefit amounts are based on a household's net income: in general $100 more in net income = $30 less in benefits.
  • Only households who do not have earned income, a member of the household who is elderly or disabled, or a dependent child have to meet this test.

    If a household has an elderly or disabled member but did not meet the Gross Income test above, they must meet the Net Income test.
  • 1 person
    $1133 / month
  • 2 people
    $1526 / month
  • 3 people
    $1920 / month
  • 4 people
    $2313 / month
  • 5 people
    $2706 / month
  • 6 people
    $3100 / month
  • 7 people
    $3493 / month
  • Each additional person
    +$394 / month
The net income limit is 100% of the federal poverty level.
Asset / Resource Limit
This means countable resources, like funds in bank accounts. A home is not counted as a resource.
If Household Has An Elderly or Disabled Member and Meets Gross Income Test

There is no asset limit.

If Household Has Earned Income or a Dependent Child

There is no asset limit.

Households Without Earned Income or Dependent Children
  • account_balanceHouseholds with elderly or disabled members
    $4250
  • account_balanceAll other households
    $2750
Deduction
Child Support Payments Treatment
Court ordered child support payments can always be deducted to calculate net income. In some states, it can also be excluded from gross income.

Court ordered child support payments can be excluded from gross income and deducted for calculating net income.

Deduction
Standard Medical Deduction
Monthly out of pocket medical expenses for household members who are age 60 or older or disabled can always be deducted from net income. You can deduct the full amount of expenses with verification, but in some states there is a standard medical deduction that can be used without needing verification.

There is no standard medical deduction. Use actual medical expenses minus $35.

Deduction
Utility Allowances
The utility allotments (deduction amounts) depend on your household size.

Heating and Cooling: If a household pays utility bills for heating and cooling, or receives over $20 in heating assistance from LIHEAP, this deduction amount can be claimed (but no other utility deductions).

Basic Utility Allowance: If a household pays for two or more utility bills, this deduction amount can be claimed (but no other utility deductions).

Nassau or Suffolk County
  • whatshotHeating And Cooling
    $932
  • flash_onBasic Limited Allowance
    $366
New York City
  • whatshotHeating And Cooling
    $1002
  • flash_onBasic Limited Allowance
    $395
Rest of New York
  • whatshotHeating And Cooling
    $827
  • flash_onBasic Limited Allowance
    $335
Deduction
Phone Allowance
If your household pays a phone bill, you can deduct the associated amount.
  • phonePhone
    $31
Deduction
Other Deductions
Households can deduct the full amount paid for these expenses.
  • child_friendlyDependent care costs (including daycare, babysitters, or other child care)
  • homeMonthly rent or mortgage amount
  • cabinMonthly homeowners insurance and taxes